Iroquois Park

Acquired in 1888 and noted by early park users as Louisville’s own “Yellowstone.”

The Olmsted designs take advantage of the rugged terrain and the drama of the mature woodlands and scenic overlooks. At the heart of the park is an old-growth forest that blankets the knob’s steep hillsides with a great variety of rare plants and animals. The circulation through the park includes a network of pedestrian paths, bridle trails, and circuit drives. The lands were set aside as a preserve and developed for access and enjoyment with the forests remaining essentially intact.

Two main features in the park:

Iroquois Amphitheater: a state-of-the-art, handicapped-accessible theater with seating for 2,348 that hosts a variety of performing arts and cultural programs.  Iroquois Amphitheater is the official amphitheater for the Commonwealth of Kentucky. The Iroquois Amphitheater was constructed in the spring of 1938 through federal Works Progress Administration labor. The facility was renovated and reopened in 2004. Interested in events at the Amphitheater, Click here.

North Overlook: Since the park opened visitors have enjoyed looking out over the city of Louisville for the Overlook. Because of high usage and need to update the area, it was determined, in 2014, a restoration was needed.  In 2016, the North Overlook was reopened.  The area features a meandering, wheelchair-accessible path which takes the park user to a spectacular area with improved vistas of downtown Louisville and the Indiana Knobs, where the panorama is widely acknowledged as the best in the area. If you’d like to visit the North Overlook it is opened daily walking or riding a bike. Car access to the top of the hill is available Wednesdays, Saturdays and Sundays, weather permitting.

  

Key Features & Amenities

  • Amphitheater
  • Archery
  • Basketball
  • Biking - Road
  • Disc Golf
  • Fishing
  • Golf
  • Grill
  • Hiking Trail
  • Horse Riding Trails
  • Horseshoe Pit
  • Lodge
  • Meeting Facilities
  • Path
  • Picnic Shelter
  • Picnic Table
  • Playground
  • Restrooms
  • Running
  • Sprayground
  • Tennis
  • Volleyball
  • Walking
  • Wheelchair Accessible Playground
Fred Facts
Evidence shows that when people have access to parks, they are more likely to exercise, which can reduce obesity and its associated problems and costs.

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